We Want The World: Jim Morrison, The Living Theatre and the FBI

A Glimpse of Paradise and Jim Morrison

In about the middle of December ‘68, down on Santa Monica Boulevard, Jim Morrison was slumped in a chair with his feet up, reading November’s edition of the west coast activist magazine Ramparts.  Life had been bugging him lately. I mean, what a year!?! On the face of it The Doors were a real success; the only new rock group on the brink of playing New York’s Madison Square Garden. Yet Jim still felt troubled, ill at ease about his country’s predicament. Martin Luther King had been shot dead in Memphis, the Tet Offensive had come to light in Vietnam, kids had been stomped outside the Democratic convention in Chicago, and another Kennedy was dead and gone. America had become sucked deeper into a whirlpool of pain and Nixon, complete with his special brand of Republicanism, was installed in the White House. What had Jim done? Talked of revolt, and of freedom. But what was he known for?? Light My Fire and Hello I Love You. And here, on the pages of Ramparts, was a middle-aged anarchist named Julian Beck being interviewed about his own controversial antics, explaining, ‘When you’re an anarchist, you’re interested in the greatest amount of change possible.’ 1 A couple of months later Jim got the chance to see what Julian Beck might mean… As The Living Theatre’s still-battered Volkswagen train approached the west coast, late in February 1969, Judith Malina got a strange and uneasy feeling. In her diary she noted, ‘Everything in California is…

Aphantasia - Unable to Visualise

What is Aphantasia?

Taken literally, Aphantasia is a spectrum condition (which means it affects people to different degrees along a range of linked symptoms) where the sufferer cannot consciously visualise images in their mind (sometimes referred to as 'the mind's eye'). The ability of the human mind to conjure up an image, upon demand, has long been taken for granted. If you were asked to picture a forest, an orange square, a toaster, or any other common object or scene – in your mind – you should be able to do so. It is not fully understood how the human brain is able to produce these images, although there are theories based in philosophy, psychology and neuroscience. Of these, it is the evidence in neuroscience that is the most convincing with explanations that the brain can call upon past experiences and extrapolate them to produce familiar or identical images as to those perceived at the time. People with Aphantasia cannot consciously produce these images; they find other ways to remember and describe their experiences. Remember here that the ability to consciously visualise is not the same as dreaming. Aphantasics can dream with images and scenes, though many report that they do not, and will only recall dreams by text, narrative or plot points. People with Aphantasia do, however, possess a visual memory. They instead use facts to recognise objects, places and people. They may, for example, remember that the girl in their lecture class who is quiet has striking blue eyes or that…

Johnny Phillips Saturday Afternoon Fever

An Audience with Rafa

On the opening night of the Champions League group stages, in September 2012, as Manchester City were beaten by Real Madrid in the final moments at the Bernabau, thanks to Ronaldo’s late goal, and Real manager Jose Mourinho leapt from the dugout and slid across the turf in one of his trademark scene stealing poses - I met up with a manager who consistently put one over the Special One in this tournament. Rafa Benitez was responsible for the most memorable night in Champions League Final history when his unfancied Liverpool toppled AC Milan in a penalty shoot-out at the Ataturk Stadium in Istanbul. This, after going 3-0 down in the opening 45 minutes. The half-time team talk that followed has gone into folklore, along with the comeback that resulted in Liverpool capturing their fifth European Cup. Benitez was at London’s Institute of Education in Russell Square giving a talk about that and other memorable European nights during his tenure at Anfield. The esteem in which he is held by Liverpool fans is considerably high. The auditorium was a sell-out and as the clock ticked down to his appearance the more vocal members of the audience went through their repertoire of songs in homage to the Spaniard, before breaking into raptures when he was introduced by The Times sports editor and avid red Tony Evans. The timing of the event was poignant on a number of different levels. It was the weekend before Liverpool faced Manchester United for the first…

Senior dating and Mature Dating Couple

Senior Dating and Finding Love

Senior Dating and Finding Love With widowhood, and around 50% of marriages ending in divorce, many people of a mature age have found themselves once again available and wanting to meet new partners. The good news is that dating at a mature age has never been easier, and often holds fewer issues than for the younger generation. A 2017 study from Saga – carried out among 1,000 over-50s and 1,000 under-50s – has revealed that dating can be more enjoyable and less stressful the older you are because fewer things (like image!) concern people so much. Indeed, 76% of the over-50s who took part in the survey explained that looks and money became less important when looking for a new partner as they got older. The Top 10 partner attributes amongst over-50s were: Honesty and trust Good sense of humour Good personality Similar likes and dislikes Good listener Good sex life Confidence Maturity Close family Good sense of adventure How do people meet for Senior Dating? As with the younger generations, online dating has seen a boom in numbers amongst the senior set. And it has actually been happening for a number of years. According to research undertaken by eHarmony, those aged 55 to 64 years old in the UK, are expected to witness the biggest online dating boom, with an expected 30% rise between 2013 and 2030 (to 2.41 million). In the US, SeniorPeopleMeet.com reportedly saw a 400% expansion in members between 2009 and 2011. Naturally, there are many…

Soccer Psychology

Soccer Psychology – Developing Mindset for Improved Performance

Soccer Psychology is a means of developing a player's mindset to improve performance. We all agree that it matters not how naturally talented a player is, if they cannot focus, motivate themselves, deal with failure, deal with success(!), and show composure. I’m not blind to the obvious fact that physicality, technical ability and tactical understanding are the main hallmarks of elite football. But having a mind strong enough to help you cope with the many challenges you face on and off the pitch can help you get the most from your football potential. And this is true whether you are a world class player in the Barcelona squad, whether you are striving to be a professional, whether you enjoy competing every weekend for your local team or whether you just enjoy a kick about with mates in an after work five-a-side league. Dan Abrahams A soccer psychologist works with players to help them achieve their performance goals. To realise improvements, a soccer psychologist will help athletes identify mental techniques to adopt and embed into their training programmes. Four techniques, sometimes referred to as the “cannon” fodder of applied sport psychology, are: Goal setting Self-talk Imagery Relaxation Each technique can be learnt by adhering to general guiding principles, however the most effective techniques are tailored to meet specific performance needs. What’s most important is how a player uses each technique to ensure effectiveness. The process of developing a set of mental techniques individualised to each player’s circumstances is a primary goal…

What Business Can Learn From Sport Psychology: Ten Lessons for Peak Professional Performance

Positive Body Language – Psychology in Business

Body language | Business Psychology If you are not the best, then pretend you are. Muhammad Ali, Boxer Everything we have said in this chapter (See Chapter 5 of What Business Can Learn From Sport Psychology) is about increasing your feelings of self-confidence and maintaining this state of belief. But in some situations not only do you want to feel confident, you want to look confident too. Across business interactions people will make judgments about how confident a person is on the basis of their body language (e.g., how they walk into a meeting, how they present, and cope with pressure). And on the back of this judgment, people arrive very rapidly at a conclusion into your credibility. Research suggests that people who look confident are perceived as more likely to be successful. One research study showed that table tennis and tennis athletes who approached a serve with positive body language (stand and walk erect, shoulders back and chest out, head up, chin level with the ground, their eyes looking directly at the camera (the opponent) for prolonged periods of time), were perceived as: prepared, confident, focused, relaxed, assertive, aggressive, competitive, experienced, fit, and of a higher ability than the opposition. [22, 23] In contrast, athletes who approached the serve with negative body language (hunched posture, head and chin held down, with eyes looking down or briefly glancing at the opponent) were perceived as: under-prepared, lethargic, not confident, not focused, tense, not assertive, not aggressive, not competitive, a novice, unfit,…

Coaching For The Zone - Book Cover

Coaching “The Zone” in Business and Sport [Sport Psychology]

The Zone Whatever the mind can conceive and believe it can achieve. Napoleon Hill What is Coaching? Coaching is all about improving performance. Coaching is not remedial. In sport, improvement can often be quite obvious and tangible (times run, distances thrown, points scored). But, outside sport, there may be dozens of other measures that people will be working to improve on. Some of these will be hard edged measures; e.g. in an organisation they may be based on performance appraisals, return on investment, cost-benefit analyses, 360º feedback, more effective recruitment, better retention of people, greater productivity, results of projects. For individuals outside organisations they may include: better health, greater fitness, better relationships, more success either at work or in carrying out a hobby. The measures for these and the evidence for being in the Zone will be agreed between the coach and the coachee. What is the Zone? The Zone is a mental performance state, where you don’t have to think about what you are doing. It is characterised by total absorption in an activity, where skills execute totally naturally. The Zone has been described in a number of ways: - effortless ease - accomplished mastery - going with the flow Interestingly, people get so absorbed in the moment, that they often do not realise they are in the Zone, at the time. It is based upon being on automatic pilot and going ‘beyond’ whatever one thought possible previously. The Zone is relevant for a number of reasons, one of…

Goalkeeper Training Exercises for Soccer

Goalkeeper Training Drills

In this excerpt from 65 Goalkeeper Training Exercises, Andy Elleray offers two highly effective goalkeeper training drills. Back Ball/Knees Explanation The aim of the game is for the designated goalkeeper, with any kind of ball, to touch their opponents on the middle of the back with their ball. This will promote staying ‘face on’ to the ball at all times. Alternatively, goalkeepers can try and touch each other on the knees, both front and back. This has been found to prompt goalkeepers into getting into a lower stance with their hands down low, much like facing a 1v1, or a close range shot. This will get keepers into good habits when faced with this situation in a match. Areas Worked •    Concentration/awareness •    Different set positions •    Quick feet Typical Setup Further progressions are that a ball can be added for the team to pass or throw around while the goalkeeper who is ‘in the middle’ is trying to go about his job. Another progression sees each goalkeeper having a ball and trying to ‘tag’ each other on the back or knees. The Circle of Saves Explanation There will be one goalkeeper in the middle and the others in a circle formation around him or her. The working goalkeeper will go around the circle either clockwise or anti-clockwise making different kinds of saves depending on the session topic (or for a warm up, just basic handling such as the scoop or cup). The servers on the outside can be stationary…

Book and eBook for Writing Non-Fiction

How to write a biography

How to write a biography. In this excerpt from Write From The Start, join author Caroline Foster as she explains the steps involved when writing a biography. List the main topics you need to find out about and make helpful notes about where you might find this information. List the research you might need to do including interviews, material collation, reference guides and evidence. Then make a list of what you already know. This is important as you do not want to duplicate research; it is also useful in case you come across contradictory information. Check your W&A Yearbook for resources for writers, picture agencies, libraries, and publishers of biographies. Compile a list of people you might need to interview and where they are placed geographically. You could save yourself a considerable amount of time and cost if several interviewees are in the same geographical area, and you can manage your diary to suit theirs. Contact relevant interviewees, and make your appointments. Prepare your research notes and file them in an easy-to-find format; this could be chapter relevant, by interviewee, or in date order. Find a way that works for you. The last thing you want to happen, when you are in the throes of putting your copy together, is to spend valuable time searching for one small piece of information. If you are judicious with your filing, it will make your life much easier when you come to write your synopsis and subsequent book. Familiarise yourself with the interview…

The Winning Golf Swing Simple Technical Solutions for Lower Scores Kristian Baker

Face Angle and Club Path in Golf

Face angle Face angle simply refers to the direction that the club face is pointing at the moment of impact relative to the target line. We must remember that the golf ball is on the club face for less than 1/2000th of a second. The exact point of the collision that will have the greatest influence on the direction of the ball is the mid-point of the collision (the point of maximum compression). Face angle relative to the target line.  In general, the face angle has four times more influence on the start direction of the golf ball than the club path does. Club path Club path is the horizontal direction that the club head is travelling during the collision. The part of the club head that a TrackMan radar will measure here is the centre of gravity of the club head. Imagine a chalk line running along the ground from behind the ball, through the centre of the ball, and straight towards the target (we’ll call this the target line). We refer to the club’s path at impact as either swinging towards the target (i.e. straight down this line), swinging from inside to out, or outside to inside, of this line. With a TrackMan radar, we can accurately measure the direction the club head is travelling in degrees through this impact zone. For example, and as a very general rule of thumb, if we want to hit a straight shot, the club path will be neutral (swinging along the…