The Goodfather - parenting book by Lee Price

4D Baby Scans – What you need to know

4D BABY SCANS: GOING HI-DEF I’ll admit, when I first heard the phrase ‘4D scan’, I snorted with derision, and my hands shot protectively to my wallet – this was another money-maker. Swap the ‘n’ for an ‘m’, am I right? Certainly, it’s one of the additions to the ‘must-do’ maternity timeline by modern mums – yet another scan. The fourth dimension here is not, as I’d mistakenly deduced, touch. I had expected that we’d be coming home with a miniature print out of our baby – but thankfully not, as that would be creepy and, presumably, rather intrusive. And, not least, totally nonsensical! In fact, the snazzy part of a 4D scan – you know, the big dollar private alternative to the NHS misery fest – is the fact that you’ve got movement added to a 3D image. Which sounds pretty underwhelming, but makes for an awe-inspiring window into your partner’s womb – it’s literally like a webcam stream of what your little one’s up to. It’s exactly like the hospital set up for the anomaly scan – except comfortable, welcoming, reassuring, not rushed, and fucking beautiful. You’ll even get a few laughs from your rapidly-developing repertoire of dad jokes. Our scan room was a romantically-lit attic conversion, with a comfortable chair for dad to sit on – honestly, I could’ve caught some Zs if I wasn’t on best behaviour. As alluded to, the sonographer had a personality! And the ultrasound gel was warm, rather than shockingly cold. It…

The Goodfather - parenting book by Lee Price

Expectant Dad Guide – Pregnancy Tips for Men

Are you an Expectant Dad? Deep breath now... Here is some of the lingo you need to grasp as an expectant dad. Birth positions Imagine the Kama Sutra, but designed for arguably the least pleasurable experience possible – no jokes about sleeping with me, please. The traditional TV pose of ‘lying on back’ is considered less advantageous than squatting, or being on all fours, which can open the pelvis up to 30% more. This also helps restrict tearing. I lost you at ‘open the pelvis’ didn’t I? Cervix In the immortal words of our midwife, a cervix is a bit like the end of the balloon, which stops air from escaping – except it is holding a baby in the womb. Cue terrifying imagery of children fizzing across the room, or being turned into naff-looking inflatable dogs. Colostrum The early milk that arrives into your partner’s boobs during pregnancy, ready for breastfeeding when the baby comes. This is a super-concentrated, super-thick serum-like fluid which provides your child’s first meal, and is essential for their development. Let this be a warning to anyone who wants to be ‘that guy’ and try the milk before the baby arrives – the milk (proper) doesn’t come into your partner’s boobs until several days after birth. Folic Acid The vital vitamin you may never have heard of. It’s recommended that your missus is popping these while you’re preparing to get pregnant and through pregnancy – so a Viagra for you, a folic for her, maybe.…

The Savvy Traveller - Travel Guide

Paris Gold Ring Travel Scam

The Paris Gold Ring Scam Likely damage: 1/5 Frequency: 2/5 Countries reported: Europe. Summary: A girl drops a fake gold ring in front of a tourist and tries to persuade him to buy it for far more than it is worth. Some specific scams are so common they deserve specific coverage in a section of their own. One of these is the gold ring scam, which is so common in Paris, and hardly known elsewhere. Each time I have travelled through Paris, I have met a few people who have been scammed in this way, and the Internet has many reports of this trick. In outline, it is extremely simple: The victim is strolling in a touristy area of Paris, or sitting in a Parisian café with a glass of wine and a Croque Monsieur. He does not notice the young girl in front of him, in suitably pitiful clothes, and is approached by a young girl. The young girl is a scammer. She is walking towards him, and suddenly starts squealing. The victim cannot help but look at her, and make eye contact. The scammer bends down and seems to pick something up from the street. She shows it to her victim. It is a gold ring, or at least a gold-coloured ring. “It is my lucky day”, she says in broken English, “look at what I have found. I love gold jewellery. I was hoping to buy something like this, and now I have found one. Is it…

Book and eBook for Writing Non-Fiction

How to Write A Children’s Book

In this excerpt from Write From The Start: The Beginner’s Guide to Writing Professional Non-Fiction, author Caroline Foster discusses how to write books for children. Writing Books for Children Writing for this age group is complex, and perhaps, more difficult than many writers envisage. The most fundamental aspect of writing for this category is understanding the age group of your readers. How you write for early readers is very different to how you would write for the 10 to 15-year bracket or indeed, the 12 to 20-year age range(s). There is a huge difference in the language, style, and interests of each age group before we even consider any gender-specific activities or pursuits. It is always essential, no matter what the genre is, to understand who you are writing for before you begin to write, and to know the reasons why you are putting together whatever it is you are planning to write. It is even more important to be clear about this before you embark on writing for the children’s market because young readers can be very difficult to please. Children have a built-in boredom beacon; they know when they are being lectured or spoken down to, and they are very quickly turned off by the wrong use of language, old fashioned terms, or writers who are out of touch with today’s trends. Ask yourself, am I writing this: - To inform them? - To entertain them? - To explain something? - To stimulate them? It could be a…

Primary School Teacher Survival Guide: An A-Z for the Primary School Teacher

Becoming A Primary School Teacher

From: The New Teacher Survival Guide: An A-Z for the Primary School Teacher Dear Diary Managing the information overload. The early days of teaching are a shock to the system. Usually you’ll be starting your career after a prolonged period of downtime (i.e. the summer holidays) when leisured viewings of daytime TV while wrapped in a duvet quaffing corn flakes might well have become your daily routine as you cling to your student days. Then, in one fell swoop, you’ll suddenly find an assault of information that you’ll need to remember – duties, meetings, visitors, paperwork and any number of other things designed to be forgotten at the most inappropriate moment. The solution to this is simple: buy a diary. [1] If you can avail yourself of one that displays an entire week at a time, all the better. Your diary can be your lifeline when it comes to meetings, and more… although you should naturally refrain from recording any information personal to the children. It might be prudent to keep your personal details to a minimum too. This is because the reality is that you will mislay your diary at some point. It’s as inevitable as the formula: government minister + expenses claims = impending court case. One way of expediting the return of a missing diary is to personalise the cover. If you are a known Star Wars fan then a prominent photograph of Darth Vader will mean that your diary is easily recognisable as yours without the…

Soccer Tough - Soccer Psychology Book

Soccer Tough by Dan Abrahams | Chapter 10: Kevin’s 10,000 Hours

It wasn’t a gift from birth that helped him score 62 goals as a youth team player in a single season. It was Acton Park, or more precisely the thousands of hours he spent there with his two brothers practicing and playing football. The park in Acton is just a stone’s throw away from Loftus Road, the home of QPR FC and whenever Kevin Gallen went out to play with his brothers Steve and Joe he could see the top of the stadium’s floodlights glistening in the sun. His motivation was visible at all times! Kevin went on to have a successful career as a Premiership striker, a career largely as a result of the amount he practiced and the manner in which he trained. Recent science is showing us that the way we practice determines how good we become at something. This chapter explores the art and science of training and how to develop the soccer game of your dreams. 10,000 hours There is one figure that lays on the lips of many of the world’s finest sports coaches right now – 10,000. It is this number that is believed to be one of the secrets to success. Practice soccer for 10,000 hours and you give yourself a great chance of becoming world class at what you do. But not all soccer fans should get too excited yet. There are, of course, rules and regulations to those 10,000 hours. Some of which I’ll talk about later. It was a…

Soccer Brain Book Cover

Soccer Brain by Dan Abrahams | Chapter 1: The Roots of Creativity

‘The Wizard’ glared at his players. This was first practice, he knew what to say: “I'm not going to like you all the same. You won't like me or each other all the same either. Nor will I treat you all the same.” At first glance this was an obvious opener. ‘The Wizard’ had a mixed set of players – two black, two white, one from a Jewish background – a diverse, All American camp who had to become a team. But these words arrived from experience. This was October 1963 and he had been head coach of the UCLA Bruins basketball programme since 1948. His self-development was in full flow and it was time for moderate success to grow. Certain barriers existed. ‘The Wizard’ lacked magical facilities. A leggy three flights of stairs to a small and squalid gym was hardly inspiring. The practice area itself was more gymnastics than basketball with chalk from the pommel horse having to be mopped up or brushed aside before training. But ‘The Wizard’, also known as Coach John Wooden, was too engrossed to notice the neglected provisions. He had a team to shape, to mould, and to introduce to excellence. As a set of individuals they weren’t fancied. None of them were over 6 foot 5 inches - short in a game of height. But, as it turns out, the opening practice session scheduled in October 1963 saw him take a first glance at what was to be his ‘Potential Team’ –…

Gary Marson Best Grief Blog

‘Just Carry On Breathing’ by Gary Marson wins inaugural Helen Bailey Award for Best Grief Blog

Summary: Just Carry On Breathing, the blog of widower Gary Marson who lost his wife – Louise – in January 2015, has been announced as the maiden winner of the Helen Bailey Award for best grief blog, as voted by the members of the charity WAY Widowed and Young. Bennion Kearny, the UK-based book publisher who published Just Carry On Breathing: A Year Surviving Suicide and Widowhood by Gary Marson in 2016, announces that Gary’s poignant and widely-acclaimed blog has been voted by WAY members as the winner of the Helen Bailey Award for best grief blog. The award was set up by WAY in memory of Helen Bailey, the best-selling author and much-admired WAY member who provided comfort and inspiration to many other young widows and widowers through her blog Planet Grief and her book When Bad Things Happen in Good Bikinis. In his own much-praised blog, WAY member Gary attempts to come to terms with the loss of his wife, Louise, and looks to reach out to others affected by the loss of their partner in such devastating circumstances. The blog records his journey through his grief and his attempts to make sense of, and adjust to, the new realities of life as a widower at the age of 46. In 2016, Gary’s writings were curated and expanded into the book Just Carry On Breathing: A Year Surviving Suicide and Widowhood. It covers his first year of bereavement. Just Carry On Breathing: A Year Surviving Suicide and Widowhood…

Let's Talk Soccer: Using Game-Calls to Develop Communication and Decision-Making in Football

The Future Soccer Player by Gerard Jones

When working with a player today, prepare them for the game of tomorrow. Often in education, like in the coaching of sports, we only prepare the learner based on the world of today… not tomorrow. The danger is that when the learner arrives in the world of tomorrow they find it difficult to adapt and perform at the required level due to how different the world has become. Does this sound familiar in soccer? Certainly! We often see certain groups of players coming through our academies who are failing to impact on the world of tomorrow. What is the solution? Do not prepare players based on what the world (in this case the game of football) looks like now, prepare them for where you think it will be in the future! As discussed in Chapter 8, it would not be a complete surprise if soccer players in the future are so technically and tactically flexible that they become almost positionless in the sense that they may start playing in one position and finish in another. The player of the future will almost certainly be so highly skilled that they can adapt to any shape and formation the opposition play, and the team they represent starts with. As the game progresses it may be the players who shift the system into one that cannot be easily recognised as the conventional 1-4-4-2 or 1-5-3-2. https://youtu.be/SXdCgcMXGxA Over recent years, the game has become much faster, and players are quicker when compared to previous…

Coaching Psychological Skills in Youth Football: Developing The 5Cs

Coaching Psychological Skills: Introduction and Sample Soccer Coaching Exercises

The Role of Psychology in Football Once again you’re stood, frustrated, in the technical area as the ball nestles into the back of the net. Despairingly you gaze up to the sky before looking back to the pitch to see your opponents celebrating - their team spirit and togetherness as evident as the scoreline. Your goalkeeper and central defenders are slumped on the floor dejected, whilst a few other players solemnly trudge back to the half-way line, refusing to make eye contact with each other. A feeling of disbelief takes over; it’s happened again. There’s barely any time left for the re-start. Your heart sinks as the referee brings the game to an end. Once more you’ve allowed your opponents to get back into the game. You’ve switched off and conceded late on. Again it’s cost you the game. All the hard work and perseverance you showed has been shattered and all that’s left to give is the same debrief you feel you’ve been giving week after week: “We can’t keep going on like this. We can’t keep giving the opposition chances to get back into the game. We can’t keep falling apart when we’re under pressure. You need to be tougher than that… …Above all, how have we ended up losing a game we should have won?” https://youtu.be/SXdCgcMXGxA The widening role of the modern day coach Terms like ‘psychology’ or ‘psychologists’ have tended to divide opinion within the football industry. Within the field of coaching, it is understandable that…