Gary Marson Best Grief Blog

‘Just Carry On Breathing’ by Gary Marson wins inaugural Helen Bailey Award for Best Grief Blog

Summary: Just Carry On Breathing, the blog of widower Gary Marson who lost his wife – Louise – in January 2015, has been announced as the maiden winner of the Helen Bailey Award for best grief blog, as voted by the members of the charity WAY Widowed and Young. Bennion Kearny, the UK-based book publisher who published Just Carry On Breathing: A Year Surviving Suicide and Widowhood by Gary Marson in 2016, announces that Gary’s poignant and widely-acclaimed blog has been voted by WAY members as the winner of the Helen Bailey Award for best grief blog. The award was set up by WAY in memory of Helen Bailey, the best-selling author and much-admired WAY member who provided comfort and inspiration to many other young widows and widowers through her blog Planet Grief and her book When Bad Things Happen in Good Bikinis. In his own much-praised blog, WAY member Gary attempts to come to terms with the loss of his wife, Louise, and looks to reach out to others affected by the loss of their partner in such devastating circumstances. The blog records his journey through his grief and his attempts to make sense of, and adjust to, the new realities of life as a widower at the age of 46. In 2016, Gary’s writings were curated and expanded into the book Just Carry On Breathing: A Year Surviving Suicide and Widowhood. It covers his first year of bereavement. Just Carry On Breathing: A Year Surviving Suicide and Widowhood…

Let's Talk Soccer: Using Game-Calls to Develop Communication and Decision-Making in Football

The Future Soccer Player by Gerard Jones

When working with a player today, prepare them for the game of tomorrow. Often in education, like in the coaching of sports, we only prepare the learner based on the world of today… not tomorrow. The danger is that when the learner arrives in the world of tomorrow they find it difficult to adapt and perform at the required level due to how different the world has become. Does this sound familiar in soccer? Certainly! We often see certain groups of players coming through our academies who are failing to impact on the world of tomorrow. What is the solution? Do not prepare players based on what the world (in this case the game of football) looks like now, prepare them for where you think it will be in the future! As discussed in Chapter 8, it would not be a complete surprise if soccer players in the future are so technically and tactically flexible that they become almost positionless in the sense that they may start playing in one position and finish in another. The player of the future will almost certainly be so highly skilled that they can adapt to any shape and formation the opposition play, and the team they represent starts with. As the game progresses it may be the players who shift the system into one that cannot be easily recognised as the conventional 1-4-4-2 or 1-5-3-2. https://youtu.be/SXdCgcMXGxA Over recent years, the game has become much faster, and players are quicker when compared to previous…

Coaching Psychological Skills in Youth Football: Developing The 5Cs

Coaching Psychological Skills: Introduction and Sample Soccer Coaching Exercises

The Role of Psychology in Football Once again you’re stood, frustrated, in the technical area as the ball nestles into the back of the net. Despairingly you gaze up to the sky before looking back to the pitch to see your opponents celebrating - their team spirit and togetherness as evident as the scoreline. Your goalkeeper and central defenders are slumped on the floor dejected, whilst a few other players solemnly trudge back to the half-way line, refusing to make eye contact with each other. A feeling of disbelief takes over; it’s happened again. There’s barely any time left for the re-start. Your heart sinks as the referee brings the game to an end. Once more you’ve allowed your opponents to get back into the game. You’ve switched off and conceded late on. Again it’s cost you the game. All the hard work and perseverance you showed has been shattered and all that’s left to give is the same debrief you feel you’ve been giving week after week: “We can’t keep going on like this. We can’t keep giving the opposition chances to get back into the game. We can’t keep falling apart when we’re under pressure. You need to be tougher than that… …Above all, how have we ended up losing a game we should have won?” https://youtu.be/SXdCgcMXGxA The widening role of the modern day coach Terms like ‘psychology’ or ‘psychologists’ have tended to divide opinion within the football industry. Within the field of coaching, it is understandable that…

Coaching Psychological Skills in Youth Football: Developing The 5Cs

Coaching Psychological Skills in Soccer: Sample Football Exercises (Part 2)

<< page 1 Introducing the ‘5Cs’ of Soccer Psychology It should already be clear that there are a wide variety of behaviours and responses on show during training and matches, and not all of them are desirable. One of the main aims of this book is to help you as the coach identify these behaviours and recognise their potential impact upon performance. Then, through conscious effort and a targeted approach, you will be in a better position to have a more positive and consistent impact on your player’s psychological skills. Take a moment to look back again at the colour coded list of behaviours shown by the player during training and matches. Invariably, these behaviours and responses bear close similarities to each other and can be grouped based upon their relation to a player’s level of commitment, their communication skills, their ability to concentrate, their self-control, and their overall confidence, as shown below. Fig 1.3: Player behaviour and responses shown in training and/or match play can be grouped together based on their relation to commitment, communication, concentration, control or confidence Collectively these are known as the 5Cs and represent what we consider to be the important components of positive psycho-social development in players. When one considers a player who is thriving in the game, then this is most probably a player who is highly motivated, able to regulate their emotions and their attention appropriately, and a player who has good interpersonal skills. These characteristics may indeed underpin mentally tough and…

The Way Forward: Solutions to England's Football Failings

Early Specialisation in Soccer (Chapter 10)

“Early specialization is a phenomenon created by self-interested and financially motivated adults” Mike Boyle. In the past few chapters we have looked at the golden age of learning, issues with the technical development of young players, and concerns about grassroots football. So far we have focused centrally on football yet, as this chapter will discuss, football is not the only sport a young player needs if they wish to become an elite player. It is not just ‘football skills’ which young players need to develop - learning different ‘physical movements’ is even more important. In turn, it has been found that too much football may be detrimental to the future development of young players. Developing fully rounded players may require less football and more of something else. It is the all-round development of young children which is essential for developing footballers for the future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_1Xa2VKX00 The dangers of pre-academies In the world of football academies, where each professional club is desperately searching for that ‘special’ player, the needs of the player and child are often overlooked in favour of the future benefits of the academy. Because of the poor quality of grassroots football, professional academies started to develop their own ‘pre-academy’ centres. The argument behind this is similar to what was discussed before: allowing players to work with more educated coaches enables more players to be developed. In theory this sounds like a good idea and yet we have a problem. Firstly the level of the coaching is not that much better when…

Golf Trophies for Rising Stars

Rising Star Golfers To Look Out For in 2017

Bennion Kearny publishes a number of highly acclaimed golf books for players of all ages and standards. However, we're going to do something different here, and make some predictions as to the rising stars of golf in 2017. Names you should watch out for include... Murray Grayson Murray Grayson, who hails from North Carolina is a name to remember for this season. Although not necessarily a big name, he comes with big credentials and impressive stats. Having played on the Web.com Tour last season he led the birdie average and top 10 finishes. There is not much this guy can´t do, he hits a long ball, strikes the irons crisply, and has an eye for the hole when he gets it in there. He should be a rookie winner this season on the PGA Tour. Trey Mullinax Alabama State University have a knack for rolling out PGA Tour winners and they have done it again with the impressive Trey Mullinax. An all-American and twice national champion he has a game that is bound to get attention from the critics, when he tees it up on the PGA this season. Long and straight with a deadly wedge game, he is sure to keep the Alabama tradition alive. It wouldn´t be a surprise if he is a major player in the US majors this season. Brian Campbell Not the most exciting player to watch, perhaps, but Brian Campbell who turned pro in 2015 and enjoyed a very consistent first professional season on…

What Business Can Learn From Sport Psychology: Ten Lessons for Peak Professional Performance

Making Decisions Under Pressure and Fighting Overthinking: What Business Can Learn From Sport Psychology

As a professional, you are extremely skilled at what you do. We’d bet that you are able to perform your skills without thinking sometimes, like you are on autopilot. Consider driving for a moment. When you get in your car you are about to endeavour upon an extremely complicated and complex process involving the coordination of mind and body to perform intricate movements safely and proficiently. If you have been driving for some time, no doubt you perform these intricate movements without thinking about the precise processes your body and brain goes through to produce them. Maybe when you were learning to drive this wasn’t the case. When learning to drive you probably focused on how to produce these skills to make sure you were being accurate. Each movement was intentional and deliberate. But now you are skilled in driving, and have developed expertise, these movements can be made without having to process each component. In fact, you are able to talk, sing, think about your day, and even navigate (unless you have GPS in which case you will be listening to that intently!) But if we told you that you had to take your driving test again to be able to continue driving - to try to make sure your performance is flawless - you will probably abandon this automatic process and instead break the skill down into its component parts. Are my hands in the right place? Have I checked my mirrors? Am I in the right lane?…

José Mourinho book: The Rise of the Translator

Jose Mourinho Book – Chapter 1: The Dream is Over

While the Carnation Revolution certainly broadened Mourinho’s horizons, the family, as a whole, were to suffer somewhat and Félix [his Father] even considered uprooting to a club in Spain. For a centre-right family like the Mourinhos, it was a disconcerting period. Mourinho’s mother, Maria dos Santos, a popular primary school teacher in Setúbal, came from privileged stock. Her uncle, Mário Ledo, was one of Portugal’s leading providers of the Portuguese staple of sardines – with bases in Setúbal, Oporto, and the Algarve. Thriving under the immense patriotism and self-sufficiency ideal of the Salazar regime, Ledo was one of Setúbal’s wealthiest men. He even provided land for, and funded the building of, the Estádio Bonfim, Setúbal’s multi-purpose stadium, in 1962. In an era before excessive wages for footballers, there was no understating just how important the financial security provided by Ledo was for the Mourinho family. However, in 1972, Uncle Ledo died, of natural causes, and his business was expropriated by the state. In tandem with the unprecedented event of a Communist mayor coming to power in Setúbal, the Mourinhos were rocked. The family lost their holiday homes, complete with maids and servants, scattered across the coast and were forced to move into a smaller house. For Mourinho, though, this has to be put into context: “From my childhood, I had friends at the top of the social classes and friends who lived with great difficulties. This made me be prepared for everything in life and to know how to co-exist,…

Bryan Adams Book Cover

Bryan Adams Book: Chapter 1 – The Early Years

He knocks on the door of his girlfriend’s house. Annie didn’t think this rockaholic gentleman offered much of a future. She had no idea that the guy, whose name was Bryan Adams was someday going to be… well, Bryan Adams. - W. Deverell For somebody who was to become one of the central figures in 1980s mainstream rock, Bryan Adams had a relatively inauspicious beginning. His father, Conrad Adams, and his mother Jane, emigrated to Canada from England in the 1950s. Like his own father James, Conrad attended the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst, but while James fought in both world wars, Conrad was born too late to see wartime service. He had been a soldier for Britain and then for Canada, and in keeping with his vocation went on to become a military diplomat. Jane fell pregnant in 1959, and one day that winter, while Conrad was away in Malaya, she tenaciously walked 2 kilometres to a hospital in Kingston, Ontario, where she gave birth to a boy. Since he was born on the 5th of November, it was decided his middle name would be Guy. Bryan Guy Adams and his younger brother Bruce had an unusual upbringing. Their father’s middle level job in the Canadian Diplomatic Corps meant that the family moved at least once every three years and they had to make new friends in each new place they settled: England, Portugal, Austria, and ultimately Canada once again. In England young Bryan was sent to a military…

Winning Your Players through Trust, Loyalty, and Respect: A Soccer Coach's Guide

High School Soccer Programs: Pregame Mental Preparation

How do you address your soccer team before a game? Is it laced with the word ‘winning’? Should it be? In our sports-minded society, it seems winning is the only thing that’s important. Players and coaches are judged on whether they win (or not) and coaches are often fired when they lose too many games. Players’ abilities are often questioned when they don’t win enough. How about your soccer team? Do you catch yourself saying, “We really need to win this game tonight!” Is winning more important to you than your players? Do they really know how important a particular game is? My guess is yes. So, with that in mind, do we overemphasize winning before the game and at halftime? By reminding players about the need to win, are we adding to the pressure and inhibiting their ability to play? https://youtu.be/SXdCgcMXGxA In my view, certain words and phrases add to the pressure. This is a huge game. Tonight is a must win. Lose and we go home. Everyone is counting on you. Remember, no mistakes tonight. We’ve never lost to this team. Pointing out anything negative is never helpful before a game. In addition, emphasizing bad moments from the past can be destructive, such as: Don’t make the passes you did in the last game. Let’s play better than we did on Monday. Our defending was terrible the other night. Keep the ball on frame, unlike the ones in practice. Whatever we didn’t do in our previous game (or…